Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Live Longer with Higher Fruit and Veggie Intake

Relationship of Fruit and Vegetable Intake to Mortality Rate... www.askthescientists.com 






Less than 5 servings/day of fruits and vegetables is associated with an increase in mortality rates.
Many observational and epidemiological studies have shown a solid relationship between increased fruit and vegetable (FV) intake and better health outcomes. However, the association between FV intake and overall mortality has seldom been studied in large cohort studies.

In a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers examined the dose-response relationship between dietary FV intake and mortality as it relates to both time and rate. The participants included 71,706 Swedish adults aged 45-83 years. Fruit and vegetable intake was recorded using self-administered surveys.

During the 13 years of follow-up 11,439 deaths occurred in this population. Researchers found that in comparison to those that consumed 5 servings of FV/day, lower FV intakes were associated with shorter survival and higher mortality rates in a dose dependent manner. Compared to adults that ate 5 servings of FV/day, adults who never consumed FV lived 3 years shorter and had a 53% higher mortality rate.

When fruits and vegetables were considered separately, people consuming at least 3 servings of vegetables per day lived 32 months longer than those who never consumed vegetables, and those who never ate fruit lived 19 months shorter than those that ate at least 1 serving of FV/day.

The findings of this study confirm the previously known benefits of eating fruits and vegetables and show that consuming less than 5 servings/day is associated with a dose-dependent decrease in survival and an increase in mortality rates.

Bellavia A, Larsson SC, Bottai M, Wolk A, Orsini N. Fruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause mortality: a dose-response analysis. Am J Clin Nutr. 2013;98(2):454-9.

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

5 Reasons Why You Need More Fiber in Your Diet


Fiber. Maybe you’ve heard it in conversations lately, or maybe you haven’t. (Believe me, it’s a pretty hot topic in the nutrition space.)

Whether you talk about Fiber or not, the bottom line is that most people need to increase their fiber intake to hit the recommended levels. Adequate dietary fiber levels for adults is 25 to 38 grams per day. Are your dietary habits within that range?

Higher amounts of fiber can be found in plant-based foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds. With the busy lives we lead, it can sometimes be challenging to get enough fiber from our food choices alone. Fortunately, USANA has an excellent fiber product called MySmart™Shake Fibergy Plus to help boost your fiber intake.



Let’s discuss some reasons why adequate fiber is an important diet goal and what some of the main benefits are.

Keeping it Regular

Alright. First thing’s first. Bowel regularity. There, I said it. Now let’s talk about it.

Fiber aids in normal bowel regularity, which helps move wastes and toxins out of the colon quickly and efficiently. If you don’t eat enough fiber or drink enough fluids, you could experience bowel irregularity (constipation). Not good.*

Growing up, my mother always referred to this concept as eating enough “roughage.” I won’t go into all of the details of those conversations, but the idea stuck with me. We need to eat foods high in fiber that will help clear us out and keep us healthy.*

This is probably the main concept that comes to mind when you think about fiber, but there are many other benefits too.
  
Get Both Types
Diets high in soluble and insoluble fiber are important for digestive health. But what does that mean? What is “soluble” and “insoluble” fiber?

SOLUBLE FIBER can be found in foods like oatmeal, nuts, beans, and fruit. It absorbs water and turns into gel in the digestive tract. This helps soften stool, making it easier to pass. Soluble fiber also has great benefits for heart health.

INSOLUBLE FIBER can be found in foods like whole-grains and vegetables. This type of fiber helps promote regularity. It also helps control hunger pangs, which we’ll discuss in more detail below.

 Fibergy Plus contains a blend of both soluble and insoluble fiber, so we’ve got you covered.

MySmart Fibergy Plus

Protect Your Most Important Muscle

Nope. I’m not talking about your biceps. Not your pectorals. Not even your glutes. Your HEART is the aim here.

Fiber not only promotes good digestive health but it is also important for the maintenance of heart health. Specifically, soluble fiber binds to cholesterol and helps remove it from the body.*
The FDA states that low-fat diets, rich in fiber-containing grain products, fruits, and vegetables, may reduce the risk of some types of cancer, a disease associated with many factors.*

The heart is one of the hardest working muscles in your body, so boost that fiber intake so you can take care of it better, and it will take care of you.

Feed Your Microbiome

Feed my what?! Don’t get freaked out. You may have heard about this. You have trillions of bacteria in your body at all times called the “microbiome.” In fact, many types of microbes are good for your body and even essential for basic functions like digestion.

You need to eat foods high in fiber to support these tiny, helpful organisms living within your body if you want to maximize the benefits they provide. Dr. Rhonda Patrick is a huge proponent to getting plenty of fiber in your diet to support these microbes:

“You also need to consume enough fiber on a regular basis so that the microbiome in your system is fed regularly. Most foods we eat (fats, proteins) are digested and absorbed fairly early on in the digestive tract. The microbiome is near the end of the digestive cycle, and they need food high in fiber that will make it to them.”

Feel Fuller Longer

Aside from these important benefits listed above, did you know that eating foods high in fiber actually helps you feel fuller, longer?

Do you find yourself snacking a lot throughout the day? If those are healthy snacks, like fruits and vegetables, then that probably isn’t a bad thing. But those healthy choices aren’t always within reach, so you might find yourself grabbing a sugar-filled option instead.

Try eating foods high in fiber during your main meals, and see if that impacts your snacking habits. Also, consider adding MySmart Fibergy Plus to drinks or even incorporating it in the food you eat. The high fiber content will leave you feeling satisfied, making it easier to skip unhealthy snacks throughout the day.




Eating a diet high in fiber should be a priority on your Nutrition To-Do List. To ensure you’re hitting those fiber goals, MySmart Fibergy Plus is a great addition to keep on-hand.

How do you make sure that you’re getting enough fiber? What are some tasty ways that you add Fibergy to your recipes for a fiber boost?


Article by: Austin Catmull


Wednesday, June 7, 2017

7 Steps to Detox Your Body, Mind, and Lifestyle




Summer is around the corner. Are you ready?

If you’re still stuck in hibernation mode from the long winter, you’re not alone. But now is a great time to detox your body, your mind, and your lifestyle to set yourself up for an active and enjoyable summer. Here are seven steps to better health and a renewed sense of vitality to make the most out of the sunny months ahead.

Quick quiz: do you feel thirsty right now? If you do, you’re dehydrated. Water has so many amazing benefits: it helps control calorie intake, energizes your muscles, keeps your skin looking beautiful, and keeps those bowels working properly (hey, it’s important). If you’re not a fan of plain water, infuse flavor by mixing in your favorite fruit, like strawberries and blueberries or lemons and oranges, or mix in some veggies, like cucumber slices.

2. Eat more of some foods.

Asparagus, for example, contains amino acids and minerals that can help protect liver cells against toxins. And beets contain an antioxidant that can help support the cells in the liver. Check out this super simple asparagus recipe and these ways to add beets into your weekly diet.

3. Eat less of others.

 Okay, so alcohol isn’t a food, but if you’re trying to detox, you’ll want to avoid it. Same with too much salt; the body needs small amounts of it to function, but too much can lead to high blood pressure, water retention (read: bloat), and other issues. And did you think I’d let you get away with processed sugar? Nope. Try to minimize your intake. Stick to natural sugars from fruit and leave the baked goods and sweets for special occasions (and I’m not talking about Fridays, I’m talking about birthdays and weddings).

4. Get moving.

This should already be a staple of your everyday life, but if you’re not super active, just get outside and walk around the neighborhood after dinner each night. Not only can regular walks help you maintain a healthy weight and strengthen your bones and muscles, but it can also improve your mood. Major bonus.

5. Hit the hay.

And by that I mean make sure your head is hitting your pillow at least seven to nine hours a night. A proper night’s sleep can work wonders on your mood by lowering your stress levels, among other benefits. If you have trouble getting to sleep, make sure your bedroom is cool and dark, and try taking a shower right before your target bedtime.

6. Clean up your living space.

Detox doesn’t just take place in your body and mind—it also includes your surroundings. Spend some time decluttering your closet and getting rid of the things you don’t need anymore. Open your windows and let fresh air in. Organize that junk drawer. Decluttering has great benefits, but my personal favorite is taking back that feeling of control over your life. Your things don’t own you! Get rid of the excess and you’ll gain so much more in return.

7. Support your healthy diet with high-quality digestion and detox supplements.

Even if you’re eating a healthy diet, it can be difficult to get all nutrients your body needs from food alone. Aim for optimal nutrition with supplementation rather than simply skating by with the Recommended Daily Allowance (which is a minimum to prevent nutrient deficiency). The USANA Digestion & Detox Pack, along with the CellSentials™, made with InCelligence technology offers our best products to support your efforts for a renewed sense of well-being.* The pack is specially put together to last you 28 days—perfect for a pre-summer detox.

Challenge yourself to build some of these healthy habits into your daily routine for a healthier, happier summer—and beyond!

Article by Teresa Elias






Wednesday, May 10, 2017

 www.askthescientists.com

Did you know that poor dental health can increase your risk of heart disease, respiratory infections, and possibly even affect your mental health?

In addition to a great smile, good dental health is essential for overall health.

The science regarding the connection between poor dental health and a negative impact on health and various diseases is becoming clearer in recent years. Periodontal diseases increase the prevalence of diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction and stroke, to name a few. This typically involves local periodontal inflammation that may increase levels of systemic inflammatory mediators, resulting in promotion of atherosclerosis and insulin resistance. A potential link between obesity and periodontitis has also been shown.

Here are some facts you know about dental health –
• People with gum disease are almost twice as likely to suffer from coronary artery disease compared to people without periodontitis.
• Some research has shown that people with poor dental health resulting in tooth loss may have an increased risk of dementia.
• People with diabetes are more likely to have periodontal disease. Gum disease can make it harder to control blood sugar, so treating gum disease may help improve diabetes symptoms.
• Gum disease may increase your risk of getting respiratory infections, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pneumonia, according to the Journal of Periodontology.
• Poor dental health and gum disease has even been related to decreased fertility and increased risk of miscarriage.

Aside from proper brushing, flossing and physical dental care, prevention and treatment of periodontitis require a healthy diet that includes sufficient antioxidants, vitamin C, vitamin D, and calcium.

From Deanna:  I get my supply of antioxidants from USANA's CellSentials, often adding extra vitamin D and Calcium Plus.  USANA's toothpaste made a huge difference to the health of my gums.

Are You Sleep Deprived?

Sleep Deprivation May Increase Food Intake and Promote Obesity

www.askthescientists.com

tired
It is known that short-term sleep deprivation increases plasma concentrations of ghrelin (a hormone related to increased appetite) and decreases concentrations of leptin (a hormone related to satiety).  

In a randomized crossover study, researchers studied twelve normally healthy non-obese men to observe the effect of sleep deprivation on energy intake and physical activity.

During the first night of each 48-hour session, subjects had either 8 hours (from midnight to 8:00 am) or 4 hours (from 02:00 am to 06:00 am) of sleep. All foods consumed thereafter (jam on buttered toast for breakfast, buffet for lunch, and a free menu for dinner) were eaten ad libitum (with no restrictions). 

Physical activity was also recorded. Sensations of hunger, perceived pleasantness of the foods, desire to eat some foods, and sleepiness were also evaluated.

In comparison with the 8-hour sleep session, subjects consumed 559 (22%) more calories on the day after sleep restriction, and hunger was higher before breakfast and dinner. Researchers observed no change in the perceived pleasantness of the foods or in the desire to eat the foods. 

Physical activity was slightly higher after sleep restriction than after 8 hours of sleep, even though the sensation of sleepiness was more apparent.

In this group of healthy men, one night of reduced sleep led to an increase in food intake and, to a lesser extent, physical activity-related energy expenditure. Although further research is needed to confirm the results of this small study, these results suggest that sleep restriction could be a factor that promotes obesity.
Brondel L, Romer MA, Nougues PM, Touyarou P, Davenne D. Acute partial sleep deprivation increases food intake in healthy men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010;91(6):1550-9.

Recent Posts


Saturday, April 22, 2017

How to Keep Your Skin Young and Vibrant

Saturday, March 25, 2017

Vitamin D Supplementation Slows Age-Related Bone Loss in Older Women



Until recently, it was unknown whether improving vitamin D status (without changing calcium intake) could have a positive effect on bone turnover. To that end, a group of researchers recently measured the effect of vitamin D supplementation on markers associated with bone turnover in women known to be vitamin D deficient (<20 ng/mL).

Participants were South Asian women at least 20 years of age. The women were categorized by age and menopausal status, then randomized to receive either 4,000 IU of vitamin D or a placebo every day for 6 months.

In the women who received vitamin D supplements, average vitamin D blood levels increased from 8.4 ng/mL (21 nmol/L) to 30 ng/mL (75 nmol/L). Additionally, measured chemical markers indicating bone loss either remained the same or decreased in postmenopausal women who received vitamin D supplements, indicating a reduction in bone turnover.

This research confirms that correcting vitamin D deficiencies in older women can suppress age-related increases in bone turnover, which also helps reduce bone resorption (the process by which bone breaks down and releases its minerals, resulting in a transfer of calcium from bone into the blood).

Von hurst PR, Stonehouse W, Kruger MC, Coad J. Vitamin D supplementation suppresses age-induced bone turnover in older women who are vitamin D deficient. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2010;121(1-2):293-6.

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Article courtesy of www.askthescientists.com

 

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Are You Getting Enough Omega 3's?



Omega-3 fatty acids support cardiovascular health, proper brain, neural, and visual development, as well as maintenance of bone, joint, immune, and cellular health. 

However, the majority of the population fails to consume adequate amounts of omega-3s.  

So, how does a person top up their consumption of Omega 3's.  I know that I don't eat copious amounts of fish everyday.  Read this article from www.askthescientists.com 

Note that combining fish oil intake with regular exercise is more supportive than exercise alone for helping to maintain a healthy weight and supporting metabolic health.*

USANA’s BiOmega is produced from cold water, deep-sea fish oil that comes from a fishery that uses sustainable practices and renewable resources. BiOmega is purified to be virtually free of contaminants and flavored with lemon oil to minimize the fishy aftertaste.

One serving of BiOmega provides a total of 2000 mg fish oil concentrate, 1200mg of total omega-3s including 1050 mg of EPA and DHA, 200 IU of vitamin D, 4 mg of mixed natural tocopherols, and is free of trans-fatty acids.

You can order USANA's BiOmega here:  bit.ly/2mNHvBJ

Please let me know if you have further questions about Omega 3's.
Thanks to USANA Health and Science Education Department for this helpful information.  See more researched articles at:  http://www.askthescientists.com  


 

Monday, February 20, 2017

Learn Why Optimal Levels of Vitamin D are Crucial for Your Health

Vitamin D: What You Need to Know

By: http://askthescientists.com/vitamin-d/

Vitamin D is necessary for normal bone mineralization and growth, maintenance of muscle strength and coordination, cardiovascular health, and robust and balanced immune function.  Vitamin D is unique among vitamins working more like a hormone at the level of our DNA.   

Vitamin D has been estimated to regulate somewhere between 200-300 genes and likely why vitamin D has been linked to so many health outcomes.

Summary

  • Vitamin D promotes a healthy, balanced immune system through regulation and differentiation of immune system cells.
  • Vitamin D supports the development and maintenance of bones and teeth by helping with the absorption and use of calcium.*
  • Healthy Vitamin D levels play a key part of minimizing age-associated bone loss.
  • You can absorb Vitamin D naturally through foods such as fatty fish, egg yolks, and fortified cereals.  Your body can also naturally absorb Vitamin D through skin exposure to sunlight.  The more skin you expose, the more Vitamin D will be produced.
  • Vitamin D deficiency is most directly related to poor bone health, including rickets and osteomalacia. However, vitamin D deficiency is also associated with an increased risk of other disorders, including certain cancers, type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis, tuberculosis, rheumatoid arthritis, muscle weakness and pain, depression, hypertension, and pregnancy complications.
  • In the U.S., only one-third are getting adequate amounts of Vitamin D daily.  USANA’s Vitamin D supplement is formulated with a high level of vitamin D to help prevent deficiency by ensuring you get adequate amounts throughout the entire year.

The Science of Vitamin D

Vitamin D promotes a healthy, balanced immune system through its key role in regulation and differentiation of immune system cells. It also has been linked to healthy endothelial function, which is important for cardiovascular health. And, it also helps maintain normal functioning of the nervous system.*

In addition, recent research has shown the following:
• Vitamin D may play a role in keeping our lungs healthy, with higher concentrations of vitamin D resulting in positive effects on lung function and health.*
• Vitamin D may play a role in helping elderly people maintain lean muscle mass.*
• Healthy vitamin D levels are a key part of minimizing age-associated bone loss.

Vitamin D supports the development and maintenance of bones and teeth by helping in the absorption and use of calcium.*

Calcium is the major structural element of bones and teeth. Your body needs several nutrients in order for calcium to be absorbed and used properly. Two of these nutrients are vitamin D and vitamin K. Vitamin D increases absorption of calcium from the small intestine so the body receives maximum benefit, while vitamin K helps make sure calcium builds up in the bones and not in soft tissues. Adequate calcium and vitamin D throughout life, as part of a well-balanced diet, may reduce the risk of osteoporosis.

Natural Sources of Vitamin D

Food

There is a very small amount of vitamin D in a few foods, which makes it almost impossible to get the levels you need from food alone.  However, some foods that include vitamin D are fatty fish, egg yolks, orange juice, and some cereals.

Sun exposure

Every time we expose our bare skin to direct sunlight, we use ultraviolet B (UVB) rays to produce vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol). Sunlight can be a tricky thing, though, because too much can be a bad thing. You need to monitor how much sun exposure is needed for healthy vitamin D levels. The amount of vitamin D you actually absorb from sunlight differs depending on the time of day and year, where you live, and the color of your skin.  The more skin you expose to the sun, the more vitamin D is produced. So those winter rays don’t necessarily produce the same amount of vitamin D that summer rays do.

There are two main factors that determine how much Vitamin D your body will produce when exposed to sunlight:

Time of Day and Year

During the fall and winter months, the sun is at an angle that causes the atmosphere to lessen the amount of UVB rays that pass through. The same process occurs during the early and later parts of each day.

You can test this simply by looking at the length of your shadow when standing outside. If your shadow is longer than you are tall, not as many UVB rays are reaching your body, so you’re not producing as much vitamin D. This means that the closer to midday you are, the more UVB rays your body is getting. Have you ever noticed that in the winter months, your shadow is longer than you are for most of the day, but in summer, it is much shorter during the midday hours?

Where You Live

Take a look at a globe and find the equator. The further away you are from it means you are living in a location that makes it harder for your body to use sunlight to make vitamin D. Once again, this is because sunlight is hitting the atmosphere at more of an angle, blocking out more UVB rays, especially during the winter season.

The Benefits of Vitamin D

Vitamin D status is a factor in the maintenance of good health. However, reports continue to show that populations around the world are suffering from vitamin D deficiency. In the U.S. alone, only one-third are getting adequate amounts of vitamin D daily. The problem is widespread and increasing, with potentially severe repercussions for overall health.

Many cells in your body have vitamin D receptors and need vitamin D to function properly, including those in your skin and brain. USANA’s Vitamin D supplement is formulated with a high level of vitamin D to help prevent deficiency by ensuring you get adequate amounts throughout the entire year.

Vitamin D Deficiency

Deficiencies of vitamin D are common. It is currently estimated that more than 1 billion people worldwide and 30-to-40% of the population between 15 and 49 years of age in the United States suffer from vitamin D deficiency.  Because relatively small amounts of vitamin D are obtained through the diet and so many lifestyle factors reduce endogenous vitamin D synthesis, supplementation becomes an important avenue for achieving and maintaining optimal vitamin D status.

Vitamin D deficiency is most directly related to poor bone health, including rickets and osteomalacia. However, vitamin D deficiency is also associated with an increased risk of other disorders, including certain cancers, type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis, tuberculosis, rheumatoid arthritis, muscle weakness and pain, depression, hypertension, and pregnancy complications.

While many of these associations are actively being researched to determine the extent of their connection with vitamin D deficiency, we currently know that vitamin D unquestionably exerts a significant influence on many body systems.

Signs and Risk Factors of Vitamin D Deficiency

Feeling Down and Out

Turns out, when you run low on vitamin D, it takes a pretty serious toll on your mood. This is because our brains produce serotonin—a hormone that affects our moods—at a higher rate when we’re exposed to sunshine or bright light. And as I mentioned, more exposure to sunlight means more vitamin D.

Skin Color

Those with darker skin are at a higher risk for vitamin D deficiency because skin pigment has a direct correlation with how much vitamin D is absorbed. Some research suggests that those with darker skin may need up to 10 times more sun exposure than those with lighter skin to produce a comparable amount of vitamin D.

Age

Besides the fact that older people usually spend more time indoors, aging correlates to vitamin D deficiency in a couple of ways. First, the skin loses its ability to absorb as much vitamin D as we get older. And second, our kidneys slowly become less effective at converting vitamin D into the form used by our bodies.

Sweat

Excessive sweating (specifically, on your forehead) is a very common symptom of those facing vitamin D deficiency. So if you’re constantly wiping the sweat off your brow (outside of the gym), you might want to look into getting a blood test done to check your levels.

Achy Bones

Many people who are unknowingly deficient in vitamin D will complain of bones and joints that are achy or painful. This is because vitamin D is very important for maintaining strong bones. Calcium and phosphorus are essential for developing a healthy structure and strength of your bones, and you need vitamin D to absorb these minerals.

Excessive Weight

Vitamin D is fat-soluble—meaning that the fat in our bodies is how we collect and store it. So if you’re overweight, the excessive amount of fat in your body needs a comparable amount of vitamin D to absorb. So you’ll need a lot more vitamin D than someone with a lower percentage of body fat.

Gut Problems

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin. So certain gut conditions that cause a lower absorption of fat can also lower your absorption of vitamin D.

How Much Vitamin D Do You Need?

It varies depending on where you look, but here is a chart of the recommended daily intakes from various organizations, brought to you by the Vitamin D Council.

VITAMIN D – IU TO MICROGRAM CONVERSION

1 microgram vitamin D = 40 IU vitamin D
e.g. 400 IU vitamin D = 10 mcg vitamin D

How Safe is Vitamin D?

Although vitamin D can be toxic in very large doses, toxicity is rarely the biggest cause for anxiety. Instead, deficiency has become relatively common. Vitamin D deficiency has been correlated to a number of health concerns.

Because of the prevalence of deficiency, in the most recent revision of the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI), the recommended dietary intake for certain age groups was increased as much as 50 percent.  The tolerable upper intake level (UL) for vitamin D in adults is 100 mcg (4000 IU) per day.

There are no published accounts of vitamin D toxicity occurring as a result of sun exposure. Research also suggests that vitamin D toxicity is very unlikely at dietary intake levels below 1,000 mcg (40,000 IU) per day in healthy adults.

Vitamin D supplements do have the potential to interact with certain types of medications (including steroids and cholesterol-lowering drugs). Those taking medications should discuss vitamin D supplementation with their healthcare providers prior to use.

Talk to your doctor about healthy vitamin D levels, and ask for a test to find out if you are deficient.

The USANA Difference

Vitamin D USANA Supplement Facts

USANA’s Vitamin D supplement is made with cholecalciferol (vitamin D3), which research suggests is better than competing forms at raising levels of vitamin D in the blood. A clinical study conducted by USANA scientists showed individuals taking USANA products are six times more likely to have vitamin D levels in the optimal range.*
Even when the winter months are behind us, it doesn’t mean your body needs less of a good thing. USANA’s Vitamin D supplement is a safe and easy way to get 2,000 IU of maximum-strength vitamin D enhanced with 30 μg of vitamin K.*

Frequently Asked Questions








Additional Resources

Vitamin D Deficiency: The Truth Revealed
The ABCs of Vitamin D
Scientifically Speaking: Got Vitamin D?
Uncovering the Benefits of Vitamin D
Vitamin D is a Supplement for All Seasons



*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

References

  • Vitamin D Council. https://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/how-do-i-get-the-vitamin-d-my-body-needs/
  • Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Willett WC, Wong JB, Giovannucci E, Dietrich T, Dawson-Hughes B. Fracture prevention with vitamin D supplementation: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. 2005. JAMA 293(18):2257-2264.
  • Bodnar LM, Simhan HN, Powers RW, Frank MP, Cooperstein E, Roberts JM. High Prevalence of Vitamin D Insufficiency in Black and White Pregnant Women Residing in the Northern United States and Their Neonates. 2007. J Nutr 137:447-452.
  • DeLuca HF. Overview of general physiologic features and functions of vitamin D. 2004. Am J Clin Nutr 80(6 Suppl):1689S-1696S.
  • Feskanich D, Willett WC, Colditz GA. Calcium, vitamin D, milk consumption, and hip fractures: a prospective study among postmenopausal women. 2003. Am J Clin Nutr 77(2):504-511.
  • Holick MF. Vitamin D: importance in the prevention of cancers, type 1 diabetes, heart disease, and osteoporosis. 2004. Am J Clin Nutr 79(3):362-371.
  • Jackson RD, LaCroix AZ, Gass M, et al. Calcium plus vitamin D supplementation and the risk of fractures. 2006. N Engl J Med 354(7):669- 683.
  • Jumar J, Muntner P, Kaskel FJ, Hailpern SM, Melamed ML. Prevalence and Associations of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Deficiency in US Children: NHANES 2001-2004. 2009. Pediatrics 124:e362-e370.
  • Looker AC, Pfeiffer CM, Lacher DA, Schleicher RL, Picciano MF, Yetley EA. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D status of the US population: 1988- 1994 compared with 2000-2004. 2008. AJCN 88(6):1519-1527.
  • Papadimitropoulos E, Wells G, Shea B, Gillespie W, Weaver B, Zytaruk N, Cranney A, Adachi J, Tugwell P, Josse R, Greenwood C, Guyatt G. Meta-analyses of therapies for postmenopausal osteoporosis. VIII: Meta-analysis of the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in preventing osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. 2002. Endocr Rev 23(4):560-9.
  • Saintonge S, Bang H, Gerber LM. Implications of a New Definition of Vitamin D Deficiency in a Multiracial US Adolescent Population: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III. 2009. Pediatrics 123(3):797-803.

 

 

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Research Shows How Omega-3 Fatty Acids Keep Your Heart Healthy



Omega-3 Fatty Acids Support Heart Health

Heart disease is a leading cause of death for both men and women. There are many risk factors that can contribute to developing heart disease. Some risk factors cannot be modified like age and family history. But others such as smoking, poor diet, lack of exercise, eating fruits and vegetables, and high blood pressure are all modifiable by making healthier lifestyle choices.

Research presented at the 2016 American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions showed a positive correlation between circulating omega-3 fatty acids and a major risk factor for heart disease. In this study, 2036 young healthy adults volunteered. Researchers measured blood pressure and blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids. Individuals were then divided into four groups, from those with the highest amount of omega-3 fatty acids in their blood to those with the lowest levels. 

The results showed that healthy young adults who had the highest blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids had lower systolic and diastolic blood pressures than healthy young adults with the lowest levels.

These important healthy fats are found mostly in fish and some plant sources. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are largely found in fish, especially cold water fish like salmon, tuna, mackerel and sardines (sometimes called “marine omega-3’s”). Vegetarian sources include some vegetable oils, walnuts, and flax seeds. However, the primary omega-3 fatty acid found in plant sources is alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Conversion of ALA to EPA and DHA is limited in humans and generally used for energy.

This is not the first study to associate higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids with a decreased risk of cardiovascular disease but adds further evidence that promoting diets rich in omega-3 fatty acids can help support heart health.

American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016. http://news.heart.org/diet-rich-in-omega-3s-lowers-blood-pressure-in-young-healthy-adults/
Clark CM, Monahan KD, Drew RC. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation attenuates blood pressure increase at onset of isometric handgrip exercise in healthy young and older humans. Physiol Rep. 2016;4(14).
Walser B, Giordano RM, Stebbins CL. Supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids augments brachial artery dilation and blood flow during forearm contraction. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2006;97(3):347-54.

For further information on heart health and the USANA BiOmega 3 fatty acids,
please contact me at:  watersdd2@gmail.com

Saturday, January 21, 2017

Are you aware of the important role that your thyroid plays in your overall health?

The thyroid gland is a small, butterfly-shaped gland located in the base of your neck just below the Adam’s apple. Although small in size, it is responsible for producing hormones that help regulate metabolism; and it affects the function of many other important organs including the heart, brain, liver, kidneys and skin. Thyroid disease affects approximately 200 million people worldwide, and it remains undiagnosed in far too many. 

Be Aware:
• Hyperthyroidism is an overactive thyroid and hypothyroidism is an underactive thyroid.
• Some of the symptoms of hyperthyroidism include heart palpitations, heat intolerance, weight loss, anxiety and insomnia.
• Some of the symptoms of hypothyroidism include weight gain, hair loss, sensitivity to cold, constipation, poor memory, muscle weakness, and persistent fatigue. 


• Goiter is an additional thyroid condition that causes a visibly enlarged thyroid gland that may impact swallowing or breathing.
Many symptoms of a thyroid imbalance may be difficult to recognize and can often mimic other conditions. 


Making sure that your thyroid gland is healthy is important to your body’s overall health and well-being. If you’re having symptoms that you think may be related to a thyroid condition call your doctor get it checked!!

Checkout the following articles on https://askthescientists.com/ : https://askthescientists.com/iodine-deficiency-pregnancy-r…/ https://askthescientists.com/iodine-content-quality-prenat…/
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Monday, January 2, 2017

Multivitamin/Mineral Supplementation May improve Aspects of Brain Function in Healthy Children




It is well known that adequate levels of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients are essential for optimal neural functioning. A significant percentage of individuals, including children, suffer from deficiencies in one or more vitamins or minerals.  

This study investigated whether daily supplementation with multivitamins could alter cognitive performance and mood in healthy children.

The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study included 81 healthy children aged 8-14. The children were reportedly all healthy and free from food allergies. None of the children used other dietary supplements during the three months prior to the study. Participants were randomly assigned to daily multivitamin and mineral supplements or placebo for 12 weeks.

The children underwent laboratory assessments of their cognitive performance and mood pre-dose and at 1 and 3 h post-dose on the first and last days of the trial. Assessments were also completed at home after 4 and 8 weeks at 3 hours post-dose. Cognitive performance was measured using a battery of laboratory assessments, which included tasks assessing mood and the speed and accuracy of attention and aspects of memory. 

The children in the vitamin/mineral group performed more accurately on two tests of attention. No effects were observed on measures of the children’s mood.

Although the results of this study require further investigation, it suggests that vitamin/mineral supplementation has the potential to improve brain function in healthy children.

Haskell CF et al. Cognitive and mood effects in healthy children during 12 weeks’ supplementation with multi-vitamin/minerals.  Br J Nutr 2008 Nov;100(5):1086-96.

Article provided by www.askthescientists.info